Moses and Aaron

Moses and Aaron

A film by Jean-Marie Straub and Huillet | 1974 | 107 minutes

MOSES AND AARON finds Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet, through their exemplary craft, transforming a familiar Biblical tale into a borderline-surreal cinematic opera of seemingly endless possibility. In expressive, melodic tones, the fraternal pair debate God’s true message and intent for His creations, a conflict that leads their followers — in extravagantly choreographed song and dance — towards chaos and sin. Set almost entirely within a Roman amphitheater whose history lends every precise line-reading and gesture, every startling camera move and cut, a totalizing force, Straub-Huillet’s adaptation of Schoenberg’s unfinished opera opens us to the stimulating worldview of a filmmaking duo whose masterful efforts are finally coming to light. A new 2K restoration.


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“I saw it at Cannes at the time. It was so beautiful, captivating, intelligent — a beauty that doesn’t want to be beautiful, and that’s how it’s achieved.”
— Chantal Akerman, director of Jeanne Dielman

“The film that turned me into a Straubian was MOSES AND AARON, after which the colors of everything I saw for the next few hours felt super-intensified.”
— Ted Fendt, Brooklyn Magazine